Friday, 21 September 2018 10:11

WearCheck is green at heart

At WearCheck we embrace earth-friendly best practice in every facet of our business model - as an extension of our ISO 14001 certification for environmental consideration, and because we care about our planet.

Our latest environment-friendly action is the installation of a 2 500 litre JoJo tank outside our Pinetown laboratory, which harvests rainwater from the roof of the building. This water is then used to flush the toilets.

Quality administrator Prinda Narasi explains, ‘The tank has a reserve of 750 litres of municipal water to keep the system working even if there is not enough rain. We estimate that by substituting municipal water with rainwater, this will save many thousands of litres annually.

‘Furthermore, we meticulously ensure that none of our process waste - including plastic waste - ends up as landfill. Instead, all our plastic oil sample bottles, caps and cores are recycled. They are melted down into pellets, which are used to manufacture industrial products such as drain grids.

‘The oil from the oil samples that are submitted to WearCheck is not simply discarded but is also recycled. After the oil and water are separated, the oil is processed and then re-used in other applications. The oily tissue is converted to refuse-derived fuel and is used, for example, as a fuel for cement kilns.

‘Another eco-friendly practice is that we hand all plastic courier bags and office paper to a recycling company, ‘says Prinda. ‘We will continue to explore new ways to decrease WearCheck’s footprint on our planet.’

Getting tanked: WearCheck has embraced earth-friendly practice in every facet of our business model. Here, quality administrator Prinda Narasi (left) and Siphiwe Mazibuko (stores) give the company’s new rainwater harvesting tank the thumbs up

Raw material: All WearCheck’s oil sample bottles are collected, emptied and handed to a recycling company which converts the plastic into pellets. These are then used to manufacture industrial products. Here, WearCheck workers Nathi Manzini (left) and Wellington Ndlovu empty oil from bottles awaiting recycling

WearCheck’s Sizwe Ndlovu points out the company’s underground tank, where used oil samples are collected before being recycled